Nature Embodied in the City Landscape: History, Theory, and Practice

Start Date
07/26/2021
End Date
07/26/2021
Description
The efforts of landscape architects, historians, academics, conservationists, and public servants frequently overlap, and when projects arise, they should be in the same room. Urbanist and city planning historian Steven Moga will explore how planning and economic segregation in American cities often relegated immigrants and minorities to lowland areas plagued by flooding and unhealthy living conditions. Landscape architect Diana Fernandez
will discuss the connection between landscape ecology and landscape heterogeneity as an opportunity to embrace the concept of difference to build resilient landscapes. Public servant, parks, recreation, and conservation professional Mickey Fearn will share his expertise in innovative community engagement strategies to foster diversity, equity & inclusion. Their short presentations will be followed by an extensive, candid roundtable discussion about the many issues relating to equity and inclusion that landscape architects are working to overcome.
Distance Learning
Yes
Course Equivalency
No
Subjects
Housing & Community Design
Sustainable Development & Design
Health, Safety and Welfare
Yes
Hours
3.0
Learning Outcomes
Learn how landscape architects are working in places of cultural and demographic change.
Explore how planning and economic segregation in American cities has historically relegated immigrants and minorities to lowland areas plagued by flooding and unhealthy living conditions.
Engage in a discussion surrounding innovative community engagement strategies to foster diversity, equity & inclusion.
Instructors
Dr. Steven Moga, Diana Fernandez, ASLA, PLA, & Mickey Fearn
Course Codes
Provider
New Directions in the American Landscape


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