FOSTERING SPONTANEOUS REGENERATION OF NATIVE SPECIES:RELEASING THE POTENTIAL

Start Date
02/10/2021
End Date
02/10/2021
Description
Part One | A New Jersey Pine Barrens Case Study - Daniela Shebitz, Emile DeVito
Through this presentation, we will discuss how in communities without invasive species,
restoring a natural hydrological or fire regime can be enough to foster spontaneous native species
regeneration from existing plants and seed banks. We will illustrate how native wetland communities
were restored, without planting, on a series of retired cranberry bogs. Atlantic white-cedar
(Chamaecyparis thyoides) swamps were used as a reference site, and we found that all sites where
natural systems were re-established were recovering strong native plant communities, regardless of
the level of previous disturbance and restoration activities.
Part Two | Restoring Floodplains and Releasing the Hidden Seed Legacy - Kelly Gutshall, Justin
Spangler
Our seemingly pristine streams and woodlands are teeming with clues of the dramatic
alterations that resulted from massive deforestation and a dependence on a water powered
industrial past. Before restoring our streams and floodplains, we must understand how this
legacy continues to challenge our water resources with issues we are facing today… flood
resiliency, water quality, and biodiversity. These challenges also offer opportunities for
spontaneous regeneration of threatened and endangered species of plants and harbor animals
dependent on these sensitive ecosystems.
Distance Learning
Yes
Course Equivalency
No
Subjects
Horticulture / Plants
Sustainable Development & Design
Health, Safety and Welfare
Yes
Hours
3.0
Learning Outcomes
Learn how plant assemblages are being used to evaluate the success of converting retired cranberry bogs into functioning wetland systems.
Understand the role of reintroducing disturbance as a means to foster native plant community recovery.
Explore examples of how our historical floodplains were buried and altered during the industrialization and how removing Legacy Sediment liberates a functional and bio-diverse floodplain corridor.
Examine evidence of the rich historical plant communities that developed a symbiosis with the riverine corridors, resulting in ecosystems that cultivated sensitive species of plants that are commonly listed as rare and endangered species.
Instructors
Dr. Daniela Shebitz, Dr. Emile DeVito, Kelly Gutshall, RLA, ASLA, & Justin Spangler, PE
Website Registration
Course Codes
Provider
New Directions in the American Landscape


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