Can We Redefine Brutalism, Post-War Architecture & Urban Renewal?

Start Date
09/24/2018
End Date
09/24/2018
Description
Why is Post-War Architecture that falls under the Brutalist lexicon one of the most challenging eras to preserve? Questions of authenticity, the use of materials such as concrete panels and concrete block, the construction of new building types like public housing that do not have inherent supporters, the often-misunderstood social policies of urban renewal and maintaining some of the most energy inefficient buildings ever built are some of the issues that impact its preservation. This session will take a provocative look at Brutalist buildings, preservation projects and research in Boston and Toronto, which demonstrate the pros and cons of saving and reusing these buildings in a meaningful way. Specific decades’ long studies of Boston’s City Hall, Toronto’s modern inner suburbs and post-war apartment buildings will be examined.
Location
Buffalo, NY
Distance Learning
No
Course Equivalency
No
Subjects
Historic Preservation
Health, Safety and Welfare
Yes
Hours
1.50
Learning Outcomes
Examine the evolution of taste within public opinion and the fields of preservation and architecture.

Define the connection between the term “Brutalism,” concrete buildings and their relationship to urban renewal.

Identify how to positively transform post-war materials, buildings and their surrounding neighborhoods into more sustainable, resilient and healthy places, fully integrated into their growing cites.

Demonstrate the connection between advocacy challenges, rethinking urban renewal and mitigating the deterioration of concrete.
Instructors
Barbara Campagna
Website Registration
Course Codes
PL02-18
Provider
Association for Preservation Technology International


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