Wetland Construction: Principles, Planning and Design

Registration Eligibility
Open to public
Start Date
08/22/2018
End Date
08/24/2018
Description
As state and federal wetland mitigation standards evolve away from an acre-for-acre approach to a focus on replacing wetland functions, your understanding of the wetland's "wet part" has never been more critical.

This class serves as an introduction to the fundamentals of functional design and provides the means to rapidly assess the distribution of hydrology on your site and create useable hydrographs for presentation of your wetland design.

Building on the student's understanding of wetland functions, this course will also guide you through the many factors required to plan and design a functional wetland. Through classroom lessons and field training at a constructed wetland complex, learn "real world" applications with an emphasis on two key components that drive success: DDT (depth, duration & timing) of site hydrology and the landscape position.

Featured Topics

Hydrogeomorphology: The importance of landscape position and where water is coming from

Water Budget Calculation: Water inputs/outputs and TR-55 runoff curves

The Thornthwaite Method: One method for calculating evapotranspiration

Estimating Stream Flow and Producing Basic Hydrographs: Create useable hydrographs for presentation of your wetland design

The course concentrates on the five basic steps in the process of developing a successful wetland construction plan:

1. PLANNING YOUR PROJECT:
Before developing a wetland construction plan, you must understand the purpose of the wetland and the ultimate goals of the project. Your overall wetland plan must account for location, size, physiognomy, basic hydrologic regime, and current/future land use. The proposed primary function(s) must be specific, measurable, and achievable. The wetland is built by constructing structural elements that support the primary function(s).

2. SELECTING YOUR CONSTRUCTION MODEL:
You must select appropriate models for construction. The hydrogeomorphic model analyzes suitable water supply and landscape position, while the wetland construction model covers basic methods of wetland construction suited to the nature of the water supply.

3. PREPARING YOUR WATER BUDGET & HYDROGRAPH:
Water inputs and outputs must be used to prepare water budgets and hydrographs. Successful hydrograph preparation is reliant on data collection and interpretation. Using the results of the modeling facilitates the preparation of the hydrograph.

4. DETERMINING PROPER VEGETATION:
Vegetation adaptation, selection, and planting are keys to any successful wetland construction plan. You must verify the adaptive modes of plants suitable for your hydrologic regime, and accurately match these plants with your project. You must locate plants which represent native species assemblages and select proper planting methods.

5. MANIPULATING SOIL:
Sub-grade soil percolation must be suitable for the hydrogeomorphic model you develop. Substrate soils must prove suitable to support selected vegetation selections both in texture and nutrient composition.
Location
Hillsborough, NJ
Distance Learning
No
Course Equivalency
No
Subjects
Design-Build
Horticulture / Plants
Project Management
Rural Landscape
Sustainable Development & Design
Water / Stormwater Management
Health, Safety and Welfare
Yes
Hours
24.0
Learning Outcomes
Plan a project with a concise understanding of the needs and purpose of wetlands, including location, size, physiognomy, hydrologic regime and current/future land use.

Understand how to select an appropriate construction model with knowledge gained on the outcomes of hydrogeomorphic model vs. wetland construction model.

Prepare a water budget and hydrograph using data collection and interpretation.

Be able to determine proper vegetation through verification of suitable adaptivity, representative of native species.

Instructors
Mallory Gilbert
Website Registration
Course Codes
EH0604CA19
Provider
Rutgers University Office of Continuing Professional Education


Contact Us

American Society of Landscape Architects © Copyright 2018 All rights reserved.